WHO: 1 million COVID-19 cases a week. 620,000 cubic metres of oxygen a day.

A recent media briefing by WHO’s Director General has cited the huge demand for supplementary Oxygen as cases continue to grow at an exponential rate across the globe.

One of the most effective ways of saving lives is providing oxygen to patients who need it. 

Since the beginning of the pandemic, Oxygen therapy has played a vital role in treating patients with severe and critical COVID-19.

“This has been an area of intense focus for WHO since the beginning of the pandemic.

Patients with severe and critical COVID-19 cannot get enough oxygen into their blood by breathing normally. They need higher concentrations of oxygen and support to get it into their lungs.”

The majority of positive COVID-19 cases have reported mild to no symptoms at all. Patients with severe symptoms that are left untreated can deprive cells and organs of the oxygen they need, which ultimately leads to organ failure and death.

With hospitals reaching capacity, the demand for Oxygen is outstripping supply with some reporting they are “running out”.

Countries across the world are experiencing difficulties in obtaining oxygen concentrators.

Medical oxygen is produced using oxygen concentrators, which extract and purify oxygen from the air. According to the WHO, it is estimated that at 1 million new cases a week, the world needs about 620,000 cubic meters of oxygen a day. This was reported in June. With the second wave of the virus now taking its toll, its inevitable that this number and demand for Oxygen concentrators will be higher.

Since the first wave of the pandemic, Intermedical have played a vital role in supporting our NHS as well as private patients with their Oxygen needs.

We are ready and fully stocked to accommodate an expected surge in demand as the second wave continues to grow across the UK.

SEE OUR CURRENT LIST OF OXYGEN CONCENTRATORS IN STOCK

Ref: https://www.who.int/dg/speeches/detail/who-director-general-s-opening-remarks-at-the-media-briefing-on-covid-19---24-june-2020